Technology Development For Wide Area, In-line Deposition of Functional Coatings

Time: 11:00 - 11:20

Date: 8 June 2021

Theatre: Seminar Room 1

8-june-2021 11:00 8-june-2021 11:20 Europe/London Technology Development For Wide Area, In-line Deposition of Functional Coatings

Many lab-based processes exist for the deposition of high quality thin films, however in many cases the technology is only capable of coating small areas, batch processing and not scaleable for industrial use.  In addition, these processes can be inflexible or have high set-up or running costs.  The CVD research group at Salford University has… Read more »

Surface & Coatings Technology Network

Many lab-based processes exist for the deposition of high quality thin films, however in many cases the technology is only capable of coating small areas, batch processing and not scaleable for industrial use.  In addition, these processes can be inflexible or have high set-up or running costs.  The CVD research group at Salford University has overcome these problems by the development of a range of atmospheric pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) coaters with the ability to scale-up and integrate into industrial processes.  The CVD systems employ thermal, flame and plasma technologies, and multiple precursor delivery technologies including flash evaporation and aerosol.  They are used for producing tailored thin film coatings with added value functional properties. Depending on the exact process it is possible to deposit on low melting point materials such as plastics.

This presentation will demonstrate how CVD technology can be adapted to meet a range of nanostructured coating and surface structure for wider application.  Recently these have included the development of the various layers which make up an active solar cell from the front transparent conductor to the electric current producing absorber. The choice of deposition parameters was critical to material properties and hence optimisation of cell performance.  Another CVD application for self-clean surfaces utilises the photocatalytic and hydrophilic behaviour of titania to degrade and remove organic dirt from glazing or ceramics.  This can be combined with coatings to provide infection control surfaces, which are a crucial addition to the fight against the continued spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria.   Further examples could include anti-reflection, hydrophobic or abrasion resistant materials.

Speakers

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